null Yacimiento - Castrolandín

A larger settlement than expected

It was a small settlement, inhabited continuously from the 4th century BCE to the Roman Age, when it was almost totally abandoned. Only one dwelling remained standing, which may have been used as a base for controlling and defending the Roman nucleus which was emerging at that time at the bottom of the valley, mainly centred around its thermal waters, a nucleus which would one day become the town of Cuntis as we know it today.

Most of the archaeological work that has been undertaken has focused on the croa, or acropolis, but land outside the walls has also been excavated.

The site is in the shape of an ellipsis, bounded by a parapet that rests against a wall encircling the entire perimeter and altered by modern conditions.

Other notable defensive elements are the two different-sized ditches which demarcate the site from the south-west to the north-east, exploiting the natural slopes of the terrain in the northern part to defend the settlement.

On the acropolis, the archaeological structures are superimposed one of top of the other. The post holes or ditches left by perishable structures correspond to the first phase of occupation. In the second phase, petrification of the huts occurred, where the circular shape was predominant. The different structures are clustered together, isolated or forming authentic family units with small patios, stairs, storage rooms and houses, like the one that appears just inside the walled site.

Outside the walls, the latest excavation work carried out have documented the existence of new huts with wider diameters than those on the acropolis, which has led us to reconsider the hillfort’s size and boundaries.

Visual command of the land

The hillfort is located on a hill overlooking the fertile lands of the Gallo River valley. It was completely abandoned after the arrival of the Romans. During the Roman era, it would continue to serve as a site from which to control the valley, one of its structures being occupied, which would act as a base for controlling and defending the Roman nucleus that was emerging at that time at the bottom of the valley and which would one day become the town of Cuntis as we know it today.